What is the new ‘Stop Clock’ rule in international cricket?

What is the new ‘Stop Clock’ rule in international cricket? An electronic clock will be use to track the time it takes the bowling side to begin a new over in the new men’s playing conditions.

To address the issue of slow-over rate in international matches. The ICC implement a new ‘stop clock’ rule in international cricket beginning Monday, December 11. An electronic clock will be used in the new men’s playing conditions to monitor the time spent by the bowling side to begin a new over, as well as to aid in punishing teams for time wasting.

The digital clock will be utilize in 59 matches during the testing period. Which runs from December 2023 to April 2024. The regulation use beginning with the first T20I between England and the West Indies on Tuesday, December 12. A stop watch is use to track the time between overs during the match.

“Under clause 41.9 of the revised Men’s ODI and T20I playing conditions. Which deals with provisions against time wasting by the fielding side. The clock added under sub-clause 41.9.4,” the International Cricket Council (ICC) said in a press release.

The clock rule allows the bowling side 60 seconds to begin a new over, with the timer viewable to everyone on the big screen. The fielding side is require to begin the following over within the time limit. They will receive two warnings if they do not.

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Teams will given five run penalty after two warnings

Failure to follow the regulations on the third occasion, however, will result in a five-run penalty. The clock is started by the third umpire immediately after the final ball of the preceding over is pronounced dead or after any review on the last ball is completed.

If the fielding team is ready to bowl the following over within the time limit but the batting team is not. The umpires will consider whether the provision for batters squandering time applies in this case.

There are a few exceptions to this rule, and the clock can be paused in instances such as when a new batter walks in between overs, a drinks interval has been taken, umpire-approved on-field treatment of a player, and items outside the fielding side’s control.

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